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Feb 28 2011

Google’s ‘Cloud’ failure forecasts bad weather


urjpjzcs thumb Google’s ‘Cloud’ failure forecasts bad weatherWith a lot of content providers recently pushing the ‘cloud’ model of doing business; they’re trying to convince the customer base that putting all of your information onto a separate storage location on the Internet is the best thing to do…

Google’s recent failure with Gmail reinforces my opinion that keeping information in the cloud, is not a good idea; in some regards. If you recall, Microsoft had similar problem when they released their version of their smart phone for T-Mobile. There was a failure with the retention system with Microsoft and thousands of customers lost all their personal data on their T-Mobile phones; this was a huge PR problem for Microsoft.

Companies like Google and Microsoft want the populace to embrace the cloud architecture, to get users hooked on storing their information online, but I believe there’s privacy issues, security issues and in this case, retention issues.

I believe using the cloud to backup your important information, in an encrypted manner, is a good practice. Systems that I, people lose information, and having a good system backup of your important information or files that you’ve been working with recently is a very good practice. But holistically storing everything that you process and work with online and simply having faith that these cloud-based environments are 100% redundant and safe, with complete privacy ensured— I just don’t see that ability being guaranteed.

And honestly with the reputation of Microsoft and Google, you don’t expect these types of corporate giants to be having problems with losing data, but it just goes to show that situations like this do happen; bad things happen even to the best of us.

On some levels storing information in a cloud-based environment is a good thing, but taking for instance, if you are using Gmail and Google docs exclusively to produce materials and/or communicate with customers, deleted or stripped away would be a huge impact on someone’s operations. So, in that instance depending upon the cloud-based environment is not the best idea.

The estimations for the amount of users that were affected were roughly around 140,000 users. Taking cloud-based computing into the future, where everyone was using a cloud-based system, this could have much larger financial implications.

Don’t be so quick to put all you eggs in one basket— and this is why.

 

Thank you,
Larry Henry Jr.
LEHSYS.com