«

»

Dec 09 2009

Voice Recognition: Dragon NaturallySpeaking vs AnDROID


 Voice Recognition: Dragon NaturallySpeaking vs AnDROIDDragon NaturallySpeaking[6]" src="http://www.lehsys.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/DROIDDragonNaturallySpeaking6_thumb.jpg" border="0" alt="DROID Dragon NaturallySpeaking[6]" width="189" height="125" align="right" />I recently purchased a Motorola DROID ‘phone’ and I’ve been trying to get some updates from Nuance for some time now, on its initial offering of Dragon NaturallySpeaking, for the iPhone; not much yet.

Maybe the fact I don’t have an iPhone is a hindrance. I asked to be included with the beta testing team, but never got the invite.

But is all this voice recognition a lost effort on the iPhone?

Here’s a video…

Now, this shows that the iPhone has Dragon NaturallySpeaking installed and the demonstrator shows how accurate the processing is, but it’s also like the person is speaking like a robot, and to be honest sounds like something that you would’ve to do in the 90’s for voice recognition to work. The average use rexpects this to work much smoother.

Since I can’t do this for myself, I’m watching and referencing the example video. While the recognition seems to be really good [not with standing the lost in space voice] the bigger issue, and what I’d consider the ‘elephant in the room’, is the fact you can’t dictate where you want.

I think this is a big issue and from the video, it’s Apple’s FAULT again that quality applications for the iPhone can’t be created… there’s a lot of finger pointing in that direction, but that’s another conversation.

As the person shows, the dictation has to take place in an another application and then the text has to be copied and pasted in to the application of your choice. It’s simple enough, but is it really what the users are expecting; I say not.

AND on the flip side…

Verizon‘s new DROID came out and while I’ve only had my hands on it for a few days, I’m impressed.


There’s limited speech to text abilities built right in to the phone. This is done using Googles voice recognition interface/API. It uses small sections of voice, submits that for voice recognition and then pastes/fills-in the box with your text; my experience thus far have been good.

Many have complained that the voice recognition is not that good. I’ve had some experience with voice recognition and taking note that speaking slower or louder at the phone doesn’t make it work any better; it’s looking for spoken/common language. Changing the way you say the word simply makes the results that much worse.

The main difference I’m noticing thus far, I don’t have to do the copy/paste function that the iPhone has to. I can simply double click on the text boxes and speak my words. The results are inserted in to the box; no switching…

I can’t speak for Dragon NaturallySpeaking for the iPhone [I don’t know], but does it work without an Internet connection? I ask this because it’s not disclosed and Google voice recognition doesn’t work without an Internet connection, but honestly- how often is that going to be?

And while every application is going to have it’s quirks, the goal is to find the one that works the best, and fits YOU the best.

My person curiosity was raised based on is Google going to be the Internet Explorer to Netscape, or what Google Directions is to GPS devices [Garmin and TomTom]? Is it a death kneel we’re looking at here?

Nuance hasn’t disclosed a price yet and everyone is dying to know…

Can Google VOICE RECOGNITION do it better, and for free?

Oh the drama…

 

Thanks,
L. Henry Jr.

http://www.lehsys.com


  • Pingback: Voice Recognition: Dragon NaturallySpeaking vs AnDROID | LEHSYS Blogger News()

  • Weisha

    I have a MyTouch and am trying to find an app like Dragon NaturallySpeaking for this phone – I don't know what to look for – want to use it for text/email messaging as well as for taking notes. Help?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/lehenryjr lehenryjr

      I've the new Motorola DROID and to give you and idea of the power of Google voice recognition trying an app called VOICE LINKS – it's free and it's supposed to work for all AnDroid phones. You can us it for email, sms & Twitter.. I use it all the time. It's real quick, but your limited on your length of the recording/listening part. Try it out.

      I've already used my DROID to blog using Googles voice recognition.

      Hope this helps.

  • Pingback: AnDROID gets Dragon NaturallySpeaking? | LEHSYS Blogger News()

  • http://nerdetechguy.blogspot.com Ken

    Did you get your answer, the answer is Yes, Dragon works on the internet. I have received numerous errors thanks to AT&T that said it "could not reach the translation service at this time" and to Please try again later.

  • Mark

    Thanks for the posts. I'm interested in having voice files converted to text, and have been looking at Dragon vs. Google Voice. I'm very interested in your experiences, since you seem to be testing the two systems that interest me.

    I have not been able to figure out the relationship between 'Google Voice' (the network app in the cloud), and 'Google Voice' (the Nexus One app on the handset). I wouldn't be surprised if the handset app isn't just sending an mp3 file to the cloud for processing.

    Also, there is the question of evolution… which technology has the more interesting evolutionary trajectory, Google or Naturally Speaking? Naturally Speaking has been around for a long time, Google Voice is new. Do they share technology?

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/lehenryjr lehenryjr

      Dragon NaturallySpeaking can easily convert voice files to text. Matter
      of fact that's one of the main functions of Dragon NaturallySpeaking is
      being able to transcribe voice recordings from mobile devices.

      Google and Nuance are direct competitors. Dragon NaturallySpeaking
      easily outperforms Google's voice recognition. Google's voice
      recognition, I don't think, has perfected the art of text prediction.
      Being able to easily understand commonly spoken words and phrases in
      groups, helps the accuracy of the program immensely. Google's voice
      recognition seems to be doing its processing one word at a time.

      Dragon NaturallySpeaking and Google's voice recognition both use the
      cloud computing model. The information is recorded, sent to a data
      center for processing, and then sent back to the mobile device. Smart
      phones just don't have the processing power right now to be able to do
      this locally.

      Hope this helps.

      Thanks,

      L. Henry Jr.

      http://www.lehsys.com

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/lehenryjr lehenryjr

      Dragon NaturallySpeaking can easily convert voice files to text. Matter
      of fact that's one of the main functions of Dragon NaturallySpeaking is
      being able to transcribe voice recordings from mobile devices.

      Google and Nuance are direct competitors. Dragon NaturallySpeaking
      easily outperforms Google's voice recognition. Google's voice
      recognition, I don't think, has perfected the art of text prediction.
      Being able to easily understand commonly spoken words and phrases in
      groups, helps the accuracy of the program immensely. Google's voice
      recognition seems to be doing its processing one word at a time.

      Dragon NaturallySpeaking and Google's voice recognition both use the
      cloud computing model. The information is recorded, sent to a data
      center for processing, and then sent back to the mobile device. Smart
      phones just don't have the processing power right now to be able to do
      this locally.

      Hope this helps.

      Thanks,

      L. Henry Jr.

      http://www.lehsys.com

  • Ritam

    And do the Android phones now have Dragon Naturally Speaking, as of Oct 8, 2010?
    I demo-ed the iTouch with Dragon Naturally Speaking and it was Perfect! And I understand that you can email the text right away! Any comments on this?

    I would like to get a DroidX and am wondering if I could have the Dragon software on it, and dictate, and email.

  • Forevryors

    My prior phone was a Samsung and it had the Nuance software but it sent the actual voice recording that one would attached to a text. Does anyone know where I can get this. I now have a Motorola Droid and I'm still trying to figure it out.
    I don't think I have it… But i miss and liked the one I had! Any thoughs?

  • max

    Phones don’t have the power to handle this locally?

    That is complete BS. My phone has a dual core 1.5 ghz CPU, a gig of ram, and 32 gigs of storage. I had dragon naturally speaking running on my lousy single core celeron 800 mhz laptop, with only 256 megs of ram, and a 12 gig HD…

    It is patently absurd to suggest that modern smartphones don’t have the power to handle local processing of speech to text. The fact is, they simply don’t want to give us that utility. They want us to have to be connected, they want to keep databases full of our data, they want us locked-in and dependent on their service, demographically categorized, and trackable 24/7 – rather than just selling us the products we need. But this will be their downfall, because we will open-source everything right out from under them.

    We won’t play their stupid games much longer, open source natural language speech to text engines are already in development… In the end they will be left in the dust for allowing themselves to be ruled by greed. Being number one in the industry, and making millions, was not enough for them, they wanted us to be enslaved by their services too. They are dinosaurs of a bygone ages who’s days are now numbered, desperately clinging to life a little longer in a world which will have no more need of them very soon.

    • http://www.LEHSYS.com lehenryjr

      We need to remember this article is from 2009; and if Smartphones were to process data like the standard PC does the thing would die quickly. Yes , Smartphones are getting faster and faster, but the fact is, the voice recognition providers aren't going to load a massive voice recognition database on the Smartphone and load it down it processing when they can do it remotely, quickly and be improving their voice recognition database in real-time. The topic of an open source voice recognition system is something that's been around for a while, but it's not going to materialize to the main stream because it doesn't have the backing like Nuance and Microsoft do…

      Google, Microsoft and Nuance are pushing really hard for voice recognition; so they can refine it and imbed it in everything.

      Thanks for your comments…
      Later,
      Larry